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Amelian's user avatar
Amelian's user avatar
Amelian
  • Member for 3 years, 6 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
28 votes
4 answers
2k views

Why do we ask for *absolute* convergence of a series to define the mean of a discrete random variable?

4 votes
2 answers
909 views

Proving that, if a polynomial with real coefficients has all real roots, then the roots of its derivative are real, too.

2 votes
0 answers
83 views

Why some people define separately the concepts of an injective homomorphism and a group monomorphism if they are clearly the same?

1 vote
1 answer
116 views

Confusion with Cauchy sequences in a metric space being called "intrinsically convergent"

1 vote
2 answers
138 views

Finding the solutions of an equation of the form $f(z)=0$

1 vote
1 answer
52 views

Two (non compatible) ways of describing the locus $\{ z(\overline{z}+2)=3: z \in \mathbb{C}\}$ Which one is wrong?

1 vote
0 answers
47 views

Having troubles for proving that for ever prime $p$ and for every positive integer $n$ there is a field having $p^n$ elements

1 vote
4 answers
103 views

How to establish (formally) equality of sets?

1 vote
2 answers
161 views

Clarification on proof that for a linear map T, being continuous and being Lipschitz are equivalent statements [duplicate]

1 vote
3 answers
446 views

Clarification on Proof that "for $p$ a prime, the elementary abelian group of order $p^2$ has exactly $p+1$ subgroups or order $p$"

1 vote
1 answer
133 views

What's wrong with my "proof" of the existence of the intersection of the void set?

0 votes
1 answer
30 views

Clarification of my proof regarding closed nowhere dense sets

0 votes
3 answers
44 views

Given f(x) in k[x], is it possible to find two field extensions K/k and K'/k such that f has two different factorizations as linear polynomials?

0 votes
1 answer
81 views

Discerning whether these two definitions of primitive polynomial are indeed equivalent

0 votes
1 answer
77 views

Proving that every well orderable set X is equipotent to a unique initial ordinal number

0 votes
3 answers
789 views

Proving that if the derivative of f tends to zero as x tends to infinity, then the quotient $f(x)/x$ tends to zero as $x$ tends to infinity.