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Danny's user avatar
Danny's user avatar
Danny
  • Member for 10 years, 11 months
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5 votes

A good book for beginning Group theory

4 votes
Accepted

Need assistance solving exponential equation: $64=0.8^d$x$100$

3 votes

Is a function $f:\mathbb R\to\mathbb R$ such that $f(x+y)=f(x)+f(y)$ always continuous?

3 votes

Any "DIY Analysis" books?

3 votes
Accepted

Efficient algorithm for taking powers of binary numbers?

3 votes

Is it ill-advised to read books casually for entertainment?

2 votes

Stuck on Rudin's Real Analysis 2.3 Definition regarding Cardinality and Equivalence Relations

2 votes

Establishing the Identity Confusion

1 vote

Is it possible to express a vector in $\mathbb{R}^2$ with a vector with $n$ components?

1 vote

Equivalent permutation representations.

1 vote
Accepted

Show that the function $f:\mathbb{Z} \rightarrow \mathbb{2Z}$ by $f(a)=a^3+3a+2$ is not onto

1 vote
Accepted

Proof of The Basis Theorem in Linear Algebra

1 vote
Accepted

Determine where the largest integer function has a limit.

1 vote
Accepted

If $(A-\lambda I)^{k_j} \vec{v_j} = \vec{0}$ then $(A-\lambda I)\vec{v_j} = V_j$ and $V_j\in \ker(A-\lambda I)^{k_j-1}$

1 vote
Accepted

Backpropagation Hidden Layer Error

0 votes

Help with using universal instantiation/generalization when variable ocurrence is unknown.

0 votes
Accepted

Need help with a second-degree Taylor polynomial

0 votes

Proving that additive groups are isomorphic $(n\mathbb{Z}$ and $m\mathbb{Z}$) or not ($\mathbb{Q}$ and $\mathbb{Z}$)

0 votes

To show u and v form orthogonal basis for $R^2$ wrt inner product <u,v>=$2u_1v_1+u_1v_2+u_2v_1+5u_2v_2$ and find orthonormal basis. u=(-2,1), v=(1,1)

0 votes

Permutation of the word mathematics

0 votes

What are "tan" and "atan"?

0 votes

need reference text in functional analysis

0 votes

The ambiguity of the meaning of the term “average”

0 votes

Investigating the bijectivity of $ 2 x + |\cos(x)| $.