Nikola Tolzsek's user avatar
Nikola Tolzsek's user avatar
Nikola Tolzsek's user avatar
Nikola Tolzsek
  • Member for 4 years, 1 month
  • Last seen more than a week ago
5 votes

For how many integers $n$ is $n^6+n^4+1$ a perfect square?

5 votes

Suppose an integer x is a square modulo every prime, show that x is a square integer

3 votes

Using the pigeonhole principle to show that there are sequences with the same sum

3 votes
Accepted

How to use mathematical method to solve this problem of tree planting

2 votes

Number of ways to divide $160$ into three parts

2 votes
Accepted

A game of tourism

2 votes
Accepted

How many fours can be formed from eight sports teams?

2 votes

Proof of Cohn's Irreducibility Criterion

1 vote
Accepted

Maximum number of elements in the subset.

1 vote

Prove that there exists 3 numbers $a,b,c$ so that $P(a)=b, P(b)=c, P(c)=a$

1 vote

With numbers 1,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 make an eight digit number ( without repeating ) so that it is divisible by 275?

1 vote

A basic Number-Theory related problem

1 vote
Accepted

solving problem with office sit place gender with Pigeonhole principle

1 vote

Mathematical Induction Year 12 math question

1 vote

Chinese Remainder Theorem quiz question not right?

0 votes

A doubt about the Chinese Remainder Theorem

0 votes

Proofs of divisibility

0 votes

How many permutations of 2 things, each appearing an arbitrary number of times in an arbitrarily sized set?

0 votes

Transforming a combinatorics question to a binary system question.

0 votes

Quadratic Function from the Taiwan IMO TST 2005

0 votes

How do you find roots using the quadratic formula?.

0 votes

Lining up candies

0 votes
Accepted

A fantasy game on the Angels&Demons novel

0 votes

Proving a monotonic subsequence exists

0 votes
Accepted

pairwise coprime positive integers where $n \geq 2 .$ Prove $\operatorname{lcm}\left(a_{1}, a_{2}, \ldots, a_{n}\right)=a_{1} a_{2} \cdots a_{n}$

0 votes

How to calculate number of combinations for this problem?

0 votes
Accepted

Combinatorics w/ binary string

0 votes

Given any $10$ people in a room, prove that among them there are either $3$ that know each other or $4$ that do not know each other.

-1 votes

Show by Induction, but stuck on Induction Step (Don't know how to implement N = K+1)