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kneidell
  • Member for 11 years, 4 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
  • Israel
17 votes

What is the (mathematical) point of straightedge and compass constructions?

15 votes
Accepted

Proof by contradiction: $r - \frac{1}{r} =5\Longrightarrow r$ is irrational?

9 votes
Accepted

Surjective endomorphism preserves Haar measure

5 votes
Accepted

Computing the limit $\lim\limits_{M\to\infty}M\left(\frac{1}{s} - \frac{\exp(-s/M)}{s}\right)$

5 votes
Accepted

Continuity of Minkowski functional

5 votes
Accepted

Given an integer $n >0$, how many ways can we express $n$ as the sum of three natural numbers $n_1,n_2,n_3$ ?

5 votes
Accepted

Characters of irreducible representations

4 votes

Explanation of first part of proof that if G is any group Z(G) is a normal subgroup of G.

4 votes

Find the sum $\sum\limits_{k=1}^{2n} (-1)^{k} \cdot k^{2}$

4 votes
Accepted

Simple combination question

4 votes

Are two isomorphic finite subgroups of $SO(4)$ conjugate?

3 votes

A question on irreducible characters.

3 votes
Accepted

Limit of a product of two continuous functions

3 votes
Accepted

A step in showing that $\oplus_{i\in\mathbb Z}\mathbb Z$ is reflexive

3 votes
Accepted

Conjugacy relation

3 votes

Dot product of two vectors

2 votes
Accepted

Absolute continuity of measures

2 votes
Accepted

Understanding Witt's Theorem

2 votes

convolution product of characteristic functions

1 vote

Galois group, algebraic closure over maximal extension

1 vote
Accepted

Relation between degree and Hamming distance

1 vote

Prove that $|\mathbb{N}\times \mathbb{R}| = |\mathbb{R}|$

1 vote

Prove that $\sum_{i=1}^{2^n} \frac{1}{i} \geq 1 + \frac{n}{2}$ holds for all $n$

1 vote

Problems finding fixed point.

1 vote

Surjective homomorphism example

0 votes

Why does this equation holds?

0 votes

Absorbing Element is a Unit

0 votes

Topological group with discrete topology

0 votes

Explanation for the number of partitions of $\{1,\dots,n\}$ into $k$ parts

0 votes

$0\rightarrow \mathbb{Z} \xrightarrow{ f_k} \mathbb{Z}\ \xrightarrow{ \pi } \mathbb{Z}/{k \mathbb{Z} } \rightarrow 0.$ is exact but not split