5

MW Hirsch, S Smale, RL Devaney, Differential Equations, Dynamical Systems, and an Introduction to Chaos, Academic press (2012)


4

According to Amazon, The Fifth Edition [of An Introduction to the Theory of Numbers by Niven & Zuckerman, plus Montgomery, has] new features [that] include expanded treatment of the binomial theorem, techniques of numerical calculation and a section on public key cryptography. A couple of years ago, I checked out an older edition from the library. I ...


3

$\require{cancel}$ Some errors spotted in Baker's papers, referenced in the accepted answer. Expression N20 is definitely wrong (even the dimension): \begin{align} 20.\ & \cancel{\color{blue}{\frac{R\,r}{\beta_a\beta_b\beta_c}\, \left(\frac1a+\frac1b\right) \left(\frac1b+\frac1c\right) \left(\frac1c+\frac1a\right)}} , \end{align} and most ...


2

I got one in terms of dot products of the edges that works for triangles in any spatial dimension. It only uses dot-products for computation, so is very efficient for use on a computer. It is also quite aesthetically pleasing for its symmetry. No absolute value taken. $$ \begin{split} e_0 &= v_2 - v_1\\ e_1 &= v_0 - v_2\\ e_2 &= v_1 - v_0\\ A &...


2

There's lots to learn from "modern" texts such as Richter-Gebert, Coxeter, et al. But the heyday of synthetic projective geometry appears to have been in the 19th and early 20th centuries. After that, both research and pedagogy moved to other topics in math. For the older texts archive.org is your friend, going back to Poncelet's groundbreaking Traité des ...


1

There is this book by Robin Hartshorne, based on a course he taught at Harvard: https://www.amazon.com/Foundations-Projective-Geometry-Robin-Hartshorne/dp/4871878376


1

The condition $|\mathrm{ph}\, z|<\pi$ means that there is a branch cut for reals less than $0$. The condition $|\mathrm{ph}\, (1-z)|<\pi$ means that there is a branch cut for reals greater than $1$. The context is that both of these branch cuts are to be excluded and thus the "," is to be interpreted as "and".


1

Incircle bisectors $d_a,d_b,d_c$, mentioned in incircle-bisectors-and-related-measures along with the radii of corresponding incircles $r,r_a,r_b,r_c$ provide a whole lot of expressions for the area $S$ of $\triangle ABC$. Recall that cevian $AD_a$ splits the triangle $ABC$ into a pair of triangles $T_1=\triangle ABD_a$, $T_2=\triangle AD_aC$ (assuming ...


1

I have found this online French-English/English-French dictionary of mathematical terms useful: Lexique Français-Anglais An interesting resource for English speakers seeking to read French papers, and which goes beyond a simple lexicon, is French For Mathematicians: A linguistic approach by Joël Bellache at Brandeis.


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