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Example: “p: If you finish your meal, then q: you can have dessert.” in my head you can finish the meal without eating the desert, is not like "must". A simple test: Negate both the antecedent and consequent. If the statement is still true, then you have a biconditional relationship. Applying this test to your example: Is it true that, if you DO NOT ...


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This is an English question, not a math one. In English, if ... then often means if and only if. In math it is clear that an implication is true if the antecedent is false. You have to look at the context. In this case, there is a clear English implication that if you don't finish your meal you cannot have dessert, which makes it biconditional. The "you ...


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