Questions involving improper integrals, defined as the limit of a definite integral as an endpoint of the interval of integration approaches either a specified real number or $\infty$ or $-\infty$, or as both endpoints approach limits.

An improper integral is defined as the limit of a definite integral as an endpoint of the interval of integration approaches either a specified real number or $\infty$ or $-\infty$, or as both endpoints approach limits.

Specifically, an improper integral is a limit of the form:

$$\lim_{b\to \infty} \int_{a}^{b} f(x) \ dx \,,\ \lim_{a \to -\infty} \int_{a}^{b} f(x) \ dx$$ or of the form $$\lim_{c \to b^{-}} \int_{a}^{c} f(x) \ dx \,,\ \lim_{c \to a^{+}} \int_{c}^{b} f(x) \ dx$$

in which one takes a limit in one or the other (or sometimes both) endpoints.

Often, we can compute values for improper integrals, even when the function cannot be integrated in the conventional sense (as a Riemann integral, for instance), because of a singularity in the function or because one of the bounds of integration is infinite.

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