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Could anyone help me with this, because I'm intending to take Real Analysis after I finished all my Calculus courses. However I only have Calculus, Multivariable calculus, and non proof based linear algebra as my mathematical background. And it might be a big jump for me to go straight to real analysis. Thus I decided to take Complex Analysis before I take real Analysis in order to bridge this gap as my first proof based course. But is this idea feasible. What I'm concerned about is that concepts in Complex Analysis might use concepts from real analysis and moreover, in my school Real Analysis is usually taught before Complex Analysis. My main question is that whether is it possible to do Complex analysis first without doing real analysis. would appreciate any advice. Thanks

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closed as off-topic by José Carlos Santos, Cesareo, jgon, Math1000, Lord_Farin Jan 9 at 23:00

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  • $\begingroup$ Uhhhh, real analysis should definitely come for complex analysis, of one talks about the rigorous stuff. $\endgroup$ – user370967 Jan 9 at 8:03
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    $\begingroup$ If Real Analysis is usually taught before Complex Analysis, why would you think that Complex Analysis would be less of a jump than Real Analysis? Wow this is old, how did it end up in the review queue? $\endgroup$ – jgon Jan 9 at 17:54
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You should have the background required for real analysis, and the first proof based course is always going to be a bit tough! Complex analysis is usually thought after real analysis so I would not suggest to have it first. If you feel more comfortable with algebra than analysis an alternative could be to have a proof based course in linear algebra first.

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If your Undergraduate Complex Analysis Course is Computational, it would be a wiser choice. If it is not, I would highly recommend taking an Undergraduate Real Analysis Course first. I feel that some knowledge of how proofs work can be introduced much more lightly than how it is introduced in Complex Analysis if this course is proof based.

Some Information: 1.) In a First Real Analysis Course, you are proving things about Calculus 1 and 2. 2.) It isn't until the Second Real Analysis Course where some knowledge of Calculus 3 becomes useful. [ For Example: You deal with perhaps some piecewise function f(x,y) notation here and there. ]

  • My first proofs course was Undergrad Real Analysis.
  • I am very happy that I took it first as I feel it had exposed me to the right mindset that is required to be somewhat successful.

I would go as far as to recommend taking a proof based linear algebra course before taking Complex Analysis under the assumption that your Complex Analysis course is proof based.

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