0
$\begingroup$

How would you find $\int e^{x+e^x}dx$?

I know I need to use $u$-substitution but I tried changing what I use for $u$ but I still could not get the right answer.

If someone could push me in the right direction for what to use for $u$ that would be great.

Thanks

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Hint: $e^{x+e^x}$ can be written as $e^x\cdot e^{e^x}$. $\endgroup$
    – ryagami
    Commented Sep 22, 2014 at 1:48

2 Answers 2

2
$\begingroup$

Hint: You can write $\int e^{x+e^x}dx$ as $\int e^{e^x}\cdot e^x dx$

$\endgroup$
2
  • $\begingroup$ Great. I solved it. Thanks. $\endgroup$ Commented Sep 22, 2014 at 2:00
  • $\begingroup$ You're welcome. So now you see the integrand is just $\left(e^{e^x}\right)'$, to point out the solution explicitly for other readers since you have solved it. $\endgroup$
    – MPW
    Commented Sep 22, 2014 at 2:10
0
$\begingroup$

Substitute $u=e^x$ and $du=e^x dx$

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .