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I was using This Wolfram Alpha Page to calculate the partial derivatives of the sum of two gaussians. It believes the answer to be: $$ e^{-(b-x)^2/2 c^2} $$ but the working shows it as ending on: $$ e^{-(x-b)^2/2 c^2} $$ Which is what I had thought the answer was.

Is this a bug in Wolfram's engine or have I missed an obvious step?

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It:$$(x-b)^{2} = (b-x)^{2} \ \ \forall b,x \in \mathbb{R}$$

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    $\begingroup$ Of course, complete brain-fart over here. Thanks $\endgroup$ – Nick Udell Dec 6 '11 at 22:02
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have I missed an obvious step?

Yes

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