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Consider a tuple of logical expressions: $(P_1, \ldots, P_n)$ such that $P_i\Rightarrow P_{i+1}$ for every $i=1,\ldots,n-1$.

An English question: Should I call it implications tuple or tuple of implications?

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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Writing a chain of implications in English $\endgroup$ – naslundx Jul 20 '14 at 17:55
  • $\begingroup$ If you want to choose the shorter form, I suggest that "implication tuple" would be a bit more idiomatic, even though it may look peculiar to you. $\endgroup$ – John Hughes Jul 20 '14 at 17:57
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Neither term exists, so define it however you like. A google search yields zero results for implications tuple and merely three for tuple of implications.

One of those results is another Math.SE question regarding a chain of implications, which I now see you yourself started.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, be fair, the three google results are: this thread, the other thread you linked to, and a paper which has the exact phrase "...depend only on the presence, in the tuple, of implications...". It looks like no one uses the term "tuple of implications", per se. $\endgroup$ – Alex Nelson Jul 20 '14 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexNelson Thank you. So, both definitions are equally "not used". $\endgroup$ – naslundx Jul 20 '14 at 18:24

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