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I don't get the answer to this problem, can somebody please tell me what the answer is.

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    $\begingroup$ The line segments $SP$ and $PU$ are perpendicular (why?). Can you relate the slopes of perpendicular lines? $\endgroup$
    – user61527
    May 16, 2014 at 0:58
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    $\begingroup$ First hit on Google. $\endgroup$
    – David
    May 16, 2014 at 1:01

3 Answers 3

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It might help to re-draw the rectangle so that it is slanted. Do you mean the equation of PU is y=2/3x+4? That means the slope is 2/3. Since SP is at a right angle to PU (it's a rectangle so it has to be), then it's slope is the negative reciprocal of that. That would be -3/2 (flip the fraction and multiply by -1), so the answer is C. Hope this helps.

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  • $\begingroup$ Try drawing it on graph paper with PU going up 2 and over 3, and it will be easier to visualize. $\endgroup$
    – user7000
    May 16, 2014 at 1:11
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Hint: Suppose some extension of a line segment has equation $y=mx+b$. Then any line that is perpendicular to this line (in other words, at a $90$ degree angle with it), has slope $-\frac{1}{m}$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Okay, I think its C, Is it? $\endgroup$
    – user145589
    May 16, 2014 at 1:06
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, the correct answer is C because this is the negative reciprocal of $\frac{2}{3}$. $\endgroup$
    – afedder
    May 16, 2014 at 1:07
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The answer is C, assuming that the equation of PU is $y = \frac{2}{3}x+4$.

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    $\begingroup$ How do you solve it? I don't get it. $\endgroup$
    – user145589
    May 16, 2014 at 1:06
  • $\begingroup$ It is the negative reciprocal of 2/3. $\endgroup$
    – user150369
    May 16, 2014 at 1:16
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot for your answer. $\endgroup$
    – user145589
    May 16, 2014 at 1:28
  • $\begingroup$ You're welcome. $\endgroup$
    – user150369
    May 16, 2014 at 1:29

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