1
$\begingroup$

Suppose you have the interval $[n,10n]$. How do you call the $n$ in this interval? I think the $n$ can be called the "independent variable of the interval" (since the interval $[n,10n]$ can be written as $[n,f(n)]$, where $f(n)=10n$), but I'm not sure.

Any comments?

$\endgroup$
6
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Personally I would simply call it a parameter $\endgroup$
    – Amateur
    May 11 '14 at 19:16
  • $\begingroup$ Is there a particular context you're working in? In most contexts people don't really seem interested in how the interval "varies" as you change it's limits; all compact intervals have many identical topological and analytical properties anyway. $\endgroup$ May 11 '14 at 19:22
  • $\begingroup$ @grantfgates Suppose in the interval $[n,10n]$ you can replace $n$ with any positive integer. My question is: how do you call the $n$ in this interval? $\endgroup$
    – User X
    May 11 '14 at 19:31
  • $\begingroup$ @UserX Well, you could, but I'm asking about the problem you had this come up in. Because it's not very often the exact boundaries of an interval matter in the applications I can think of off the top of my head. $\endgroup$ May 11 '14 at 19:37
  • $\begingroup$ @grantfgates Example: "There is always a prime number in the interval $[n,10n]$, where $n$ can be any positive integer". I need to know another way of saying this. For example: "There is always a prime number in the interval $[n,10n]$, where the ... can be any positive integer". What can I replace "..." with? "Independent variable"? "Input"? Other words or expressions? $\endgroup$
    – User X
    May 13 '14 at 19:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.