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How to name/call this polyhedron? What's a general method for finding the scientific name of a polyhedron?

unnamed polyhedron

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  • $\begingroup$ I'm sorry, I'm a little colorblind. Is that concave or convex? $\endgroup$ – recursive recursion Mar 8 '14 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ @recursiverecursion, concave. $\endgroup$ – JMCF125 Mar 8 '14 at 16:43
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    $\begingroup$ I don't know much about this, but it looks alike the second stellation of the dodecahedron. But more complex. I thought there's a page in Wikipedia with the naming conventions, but I can't seem to find it (maybe it's a reference and not an article in Wikipedia itself). I can tell you right away it probably has "dodecahedron" in the name along with a hundred more letters... $\endgroup$ – JMCF125 Mar 8 '14 at 16:53
  • $\begingroup$ Looks like a concave version of Dodecahedron-Small Triambic Icosahedron Compound to me. $\endgroup$ – achille hui Mar 8 '14 at 17:08
  • $\begingroup$ Are any of the visible faces coplanar? If so, are they treated as separate faces or as visible parts of a single face? Does it have any invisible internal structure? The number and arrangement of faces will both affect the choice of name. $\endgroup$ – Guy Inchbald Feb 8 '20 at 11:13
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It looks rather similar to the 20th Icosahedron Stellation. See http://mathworld.wolfram.com/images/eps-gif/IcosahedronStellations_900.gif

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  • $\begingroup$ It's very close but different. On each large surface, this one has many small surfaces convex relative to the base surface. But in the 20th icosahedron in the link, it looked like those small surfaces are concave relative to the base surface. I'm probably using these terms incorrectly. $\endgroup$ – MathCraft Nov 8 '17 at 6:00

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