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For random variables $A$ and $B$, $A \perp B$ is sometimes used to denote "A in independent of B". Is there a symbol that is commonly used to mean "A is not independent of B"?

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps $A \not \perp B$? $\endgroup$ – Jay Mar 6 '14 at 20:43
  • $\begingroup$ Does $A\top B$ denote anything? $\endgroup$ – user2345215 Mar 6 '14 at 20:50
  • $\begingroup$ $y=f(x)$ reads as "$y$ depends on $x$" $\endgroup$ – janmarqz Mar 6 '14 at 20:59
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    $\begingroup$ @user2345215 if $\perp$ represents something like "orthogonal" then $\top$ hardly suggests "not orthogonal" $\endgroup$ – Henry Mar 7 '14 at 8:33
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    $\begingroup$ No, because AFAIK it is a useless assumption. There's no non-trivial theorems of the form: "If $X$ and $Y$ are dependent random variables, then..." We tend to only name things that are useful as premises. $\endgroup$ – goblin Oct 14 '15 at 5:58
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From: Wasserman, L. (2013). All of Statistics: A Concise Course in Statistical Inference, Springer.

Wasserman uses a coil symbol. I have not found the Latex symbol, yet.

From List of Symbols

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    $\begingroup$ And, with all due respect to the author, this is not a good idea. $\endgroup$ – Did Jan 29 '18 at 8:03
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    $\begingroup$ Why is this downvoted? This is an accurate example of a text using a symbol for dependence, exactly what the questioner wanted! Came here because I'm reading it and looking for the latex. $\endgroup$ – Joseph Garvin Apr 28 '18 at 19:16
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Independence is denoted $\perp \!\!\! \perp$ not orthogonal $\perp $. Use "\perp \ ! \ !\ ! \perp" in Tex (remove space between \ and !).
A and B will be assumed to be not independent unless shown otherwise, but I know of no symbol for it.

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It seems that a crossed ⫫ would do it. In latex code \nBigCI or Unicode U+2aeb. Check its use at this nice lecture on causality https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bHOGP5o3Vu0&t=2941s

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