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What does the symbol $\bigvee$ mean in statement 1.5.1.2?

Thank you.

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    $\begingroup$ You'll have better luck soliciting useful responses if you just copy down the statement and any explanatory text here in the body of your question. I couldn't even see the text when I followed your link. $\endgroup$
    – josh314
    Jan 22, 2014 at 5:30
  • $\begingroup$ I just found this in Wikipedia: For functions A(x) and B(x), A(x) ∨ B(x) is used to mean max(A(x), B(x)). Is it possible that what the author means is this? $\endgroup$
    – hans-t
    Jan 22, 2014 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ I think Did is right: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mathematical_symbols. I guess, the point of all this chapter would be clearer, if you just google for "law of rare events", e.g. see this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. Resnick's notation doesn't allow the reader to recover the meaning from it. $\endgroup$ Jan 22, 2014 at 6:24

1 Answer 1

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$$\bigvee_{1\leqslant k\leqslant n}p_k(n)=\max_{1\leqslant k\leqslant n}p_k(n)$$ $$\bigwedge_{1\leqslant k\leqslant n}p_k(n)=\min_{1\leqslant k\leqslant n}p_k(n)$$

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