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I am really horrible when it comes to maths since I never had any maths background in my High school. I am fairly good at programming ( C++ and Java) but without mathematics I cant advance in any programming language. Since I love programming and computers I took a computer course in college and in my next semester i have these topics to learn , they are : -

Unit 1 1. Set theory 2. Relation and Functions.

Unit 2 1. Determinants 2. Matrices

Unit 3 1.Differentiation 2.Integration

Unit 4 1.Complex Numbers 2.Statistics

Now the problem is , let me be honest here , I have no Idea of anything i wrote above. I just copied my Maths syllabus here but my professor says that I can do good if I start learning from now. Please suggest me what are the basic things I should know to start learning all these and is it possible for me to crack the examination ( which is after 6 months) if I learn all these. Most importantly , is it possible to learn all these for someone who never had maths in his high school. I learned maths till 10th Std.

I attached a photo showing the details. If you have time , please read it as well.

Thanks a lot for your time.Details of the topics

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i will tell my story,i also know programming languages(c++,matlab),but without mathematic i feel that i miss something,because i love methemtics,about your question,for programming most relevant part is combinatoric and discrete mathematics(graph theory,analyse of algorithms,information theory,data structures),for engineering part (calculus,differential equation,complex analysis and so on),so about your topics there are many tutorials about calculus,for example

http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/

http://www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/complex-numbers.html http://www.math.hmc.edu/calculus/tutorials/complex/

http://www.sosmath.com/matrix/matrix.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Function_(mathematics)

http://stattrek.com/tutorials/statistics-tutorial.aspx

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Discrete_Mathematics/Set_theory

they are many other sites,just start from these sites

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes I completely understand and thanks a lot for the link. It really helps a lot. $\endgroup$ – WannabeProgrammer Jan 14 '14 at 7:52
  • $\begingroup$ you are welome,dont fear just follow this $\endgroup$ – dato datuashvili Jan 14 '14 at 8:00
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I would also considering asking your professor which book/resources would be good for you at your level. There are way too many good books to choose from... I would say he should be able to give you the right material to fillt he gap you may have. Just my tought.

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  • $\begingroup$ He actually suggested me two books in which one book I found that its too straight forward and to the point without explaining much. I will ask him again. Thanks $\endgroup$ – WannabeProgrammer Jan 14 '14 at 7:53
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Be careful, don't just pickup any book, go for Engineering mathematics or applied mathematics books, both are same and then numerical methods. Applied maths with good programming skill is very much in demand.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you suggest some Engineering or applied mathematics books. $\endgroup$ – WannabeProgrammer Jan 14 '14 at 8:07
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For introductory calculus (differential and integral calc) Stewart is the standard textbook used at the university level; gives a lot of extensive examples and explains things pretty clearly. Though it's not a rigorous development of calculus in the sense that you're primarily doing these exercises to help you with some kind of application (this is not an analysis book), though I suppose that's handy for you since you're a CS student! There are some drawbacks though in that it's a very standardized approach - it feels very formulaic sometimes and certain sections are not as great as they could be, but these are generally outside the scope of both differential and integral calc (like vector calculus and differential equations).

For determinants and matrices, any applied linear algebra book will give you a good grasp on those specific topics without the need for proofs. When I took the course (I took a non-proof based one, since I was only a physics major at the time), I used Linear Algebra and its Applications by Lay.

I hope this helps, and good luck!

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  • $\begingroup$ That really helps a lot. Thanks a lot . $\endgroup$ – WannabeProgrammer Jan 17 '14 at 14:21
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As far as how long it should take to learn all of this depends. The descriptions suggest just the most basic knowledge in each category is required, so it is absolutely possible to learn it in time. I would recommend googling each sub-topic. The hardest topics coming out of high school will probably be Unit I and maybe the statistics part of Unit IV, since the rest is just learning quick formulas and routines; for those parts I'd especially ask the professor for good recommendations. Set theory is usually more abstract than what students are used to after public school. Though the set theory is particularly basic.

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  • $\begingroup$ I see... thanks you for your answer. $\endgroup$ – WannabeProgrammer Jan 17 '14 at 14:23

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