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What does the raised $2$ stand for? My first guess was: $4^2$ is $2\times 4=8$?

Note: Am not really good at math

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  • $\begingroup$ Is that it? I guess a few operators are missing in your question. $\endgroup$
    – lsp
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:21
  • $\begingroup$ OP that is called an exponent. it means you multiply the number by itself two times. $\endgroup$
    – Don Larynx
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ @lsp, yes. I never really understood what it actually represent, came across this site, and thought I'll ask. $\endgroup$
    – blade19899
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:24
  • $\begingroup$ @DonLarynx, so, 2x4??? $\endgroup$
    – blade19899
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:24
  • $\begingroup$ @blade19899 No, $4\times 4$. And $4^3$ is $4\times4\times4$ and so on. $\endgroup$
    – Jack M
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:25

1 Answer 1

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It is called 'exponent' or 'power'.

Here $4^2$ means $4$ multiplied twice or in other words product of two $4's$. So: $$4^2 = 4*4 = 16$$ Similarly $7^3$ means $7$ multiplied thrice or in other words product of three $7's$. So: $$7^3 = 7*7*7 = 343$$ Since you are a starter, you can get more information about it here.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks, understand it better now! $\endgroup$
    – blade19899
    Dec 23, 2013 at 12:34
  • $\begingroup$ I'm curious, why do you prefer $*$ to $\times$? In particular, is it purely an aesthetic choice? $\endgroup$ Jan 9, 2014 at 9:43
  • $\begingroup$ Some use 'x', some use '.', some use '*'. Depends on who is comfortable with what. As far as I am concerned there is nothing wrong with using any of them. $\endgroup$
    – lsp
    Jan 9, 2014 at 9:47
  • $\begingroup$ Hmm ... $4 \times 4$ ... is it really $4$ multiplied by itself twice? Actually, there is only one multiplication. $\endgroup$
    – GEdgar
    Jan 9, 2014 at 14:02
  • $\begingroup$ Overlooked ! Made a change now. Thanks for the notice. $\endgroup$
    – lsp
    Jan 9, 2014 at 14:04

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