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Let's say we have a function f(x,y) = $x^2 + y^2$ , where x and y are real numbers and I have to compute the integral

$ I = \int g(v) \triangledown_{v} f(v) dv $, where v = [x, y]$^T$ and g(v) is a $R^2 \rightarrow R$ is another function.

If possible can you point to relevant resources where I can learn about the problem stated above.

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  • $\begingroup$ Just compute the gradient and replace with its expression in I. $\endgroup$
    – Maxime
    Commented Jun 11 at 9:26
  • $\begingroup$ Is that a gradient or a directional derivative? $\endgroup$
    – Kurt G.
    Commented Jun 11 at 9:35
  • $\begingroup$ @KurtG. It's gradient $\endgroup$
    – Aur Bhai
    Commented Jun 11 at 9:49
  • $\begingroup$ Can you calculate it for us? $\endgroup$
    – Kurt G.
    Commented Jun 11 at 9:49
  • $\begingroup$ @KurtG. In this case it will be 2$[x, y]^T$ $\endgroup$
    – Aur Bhai
    Commented Jun 11 at 9:52

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