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I stumbled upon Strogatz's Book "Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos" and I find it just awesome. The interesting, informal way of writing and the quality of explanations made me finish the book just for fun and curiosity. I am looking for technical books with similar style. The topic is not the main concern here; I didn't plan to read Strogatz's book, but it was so good that I did that. If you people have recommendations for technical books that just make you want to read them, I would appreciate it a lot if you could share it here.

I am an engineering graduate, so the topic should be somewhat advanced.

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    $\begingroup$ "QFT in a Nutshell" by Zee has a lovely informal tone, it's "technical", although it's physics, not mathematics. $\endgroup$ Commented Nov 6, 2022 at 21:52

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I really enjoyed the books by J. Micheal Steele.

  • "Cauchy-Schwarz Master class" is a really enjoyable introduction to different types of inequalities, all of which come handy in analysis. It has very leisurely style, a lot of fun details, and is easy to read. Link
  • "Stochastic Calculus and Financial Applications" has similar style but it much more rigorous than the one above and harder to read. This is not surprising given that subject itself is very technical. But again, the author makes it fun to study the book. Link
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Since you are open to the actual topic, I would strongly recommend The theoretical minimum series by Leonard Susskind.

As of today, there are three published books

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