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I was wondering if it was indeed possible to perform a transposed vector multiplication with another transposed vector. And if so how I'm supposed to do so.

Background: From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Complex_normal_distribution I saw enter image description here

As you can see in the exponential there is a multiplication between two transposed vectors.

I'm not sure if it's a typo or not.

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    $\begingroup$ It is probably easier to read the first term, the double row vector, as the transposed complex conjugate of the last one, the double column vector. These are block matrices as the solution by @a_confused_student points out. $\endgroup$ May 27 at 14:48
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    $\begingroup$ For clarity, there should be a comma to separate the entries in the transposed vector. I have edited the wiki-page to insert one. $\endgroup$
    – mike stone
    May 28 at 12:00
  • $\begingroup$ @mikestone I think it would be even clearer if there was a vertical concatenation before transposing, i.e. just like the term on the right of the covariance, but transposed $\endgroup$
    – Luca Citi
    May 28 at 19:22

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I understand, that it is not a multiplication but instead a concatenation of two transposed vectors just like how the matrix is characterized by 4 different matrices within.

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