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Is there a fancy name for the "left side" and "right side" of a decimal number?

(That is, the pre-decimal part and the post-decimal part.)

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    $\begingroup$ The integral part and the fractional part? $\endgroup$ – Cameron Williams Jul 16 '13 at 0:26
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We really do use "integer part" and "fractional part" respectively: see Wikipedia, e.g., on decimal fractions.

The integer part, or integral part of a decimal number is the part to the left of the decimal separator. (See also truncation.) The part from the decimal separator to the right is the fractional part.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ahh yes perfect. That's exactly what I was looking for. Will accept at some point. $\endgroup$ – Ben Jul 16 '13 at 0:31
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    $\begingroup$ I thought your question was fine. Some use "radix" to designate the decimal separator. A decimal fraction refers to a fraction whose denominator is a power of ten. $\endgroup$ – amWhy Jul 16 '13 at 0:35
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    $\begingroup$ Just to clarify, radix is the actual dot? Learning all sorts of new words today, cheers. $\endgroup$ – Ben Jul 16 '13 at 0:38
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    $\begingroup$ Yes...radix would be the "dot"! ;-) $\endgroup$ – amWhy Jul 16 '13 at 0:39
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    $\begingroup$ @Ben "Just to clarify, radix is the actual dot?" The radix is the base of the number system. Calling the dot a "radix" is just wrong. Calling it the "radix point" is correct (it's not a dot in all language locales). $\endgroup$ – Jim Balter Sep 2 at 4:00
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In normal use, "integer part" and "fractional part" does reign supreme.

However if the decimal is used in the context of logarithms, the terms you want are "characteristic" and "mantissa". A generation ago, when sliderules were common, these terms were better known.

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  • $\begingroup$ whistle That's the sort of fancypants thing I was expecting, something that's fun to say, like "Mantissa". I think I may bow to the supreme non-slideruler, though. $\endgroup$ – Ben Jul 16 '13 at 0:36
  • $\begingroup$ By the way, I assume the characteristic is the integer part? $\endgroup$ – Ben Jul 16 '13 at 0:37
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    $\begingroup$ @Steve, that's right; follow the link I gave for more details. $\endgroup$ – vadim123 Jul 16 '13 at 4:35
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The left side of the decimal is called whole number and the right side of the decimal is known as decimal.

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