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I've almost read the "Book of Proof" by Richard Hammack and I fell in love with the way it has been written. I am looking forward to strengthen my knowledge in the field of Discrete Mathematics, so I'd like to have some books that extend the covered in Hammack's book.

To give you some words, that would point you in the direction I'd like to follow:
I am currently taking my Bachelor's degree in Software Engineering. I would consider myself as the kind of learner who wants to understand the concept behind everything, not just remember some formulas. I am studying mathematics really hard right now, because I'd like to become as great at problem solving as possible. Among my future goals is the very ambitious thing to contribute in a project, which aims to optimize the boring, repetitive things that humans are often attached to at their works.

(Books that include some Graph Theory and Combinatorics would win bonus points, however, please recommend a book even if it does not contain them.)
Thank you!

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome. It could be useful to explain your motivations, long term goals. $\endgroup$
    – FShrike
    Feb 3, 2022 at 16:04
  • $\begingroup$ @FShrike Thank you for the suggestion, my question is more explicit now $\endgroup$ Feb 3, 2022 at 16:19
  • $\begingroup$ Doug West's Introduction to Graph Theory is a nice undergrad level text for Graph Theory. I personally quite like the writing style, and it has a plethora of nice problems at the end of each chapter. $\endgroup$ Feb 3, 2022 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ Does this answer your question? Basic book about mathematical proofs $\endgroup$ Oct 8, 2023 at 18:47

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What book we used in my discrete math class was Kenneth Rosen's Discrete Mathematics and its Applications. Book goes through basic proofs, functions, and combinatorics just like what you would see in the Book of Proof. What I like in this book is it touches on graph theory, run-time analysis, and algorithms that you will see in software engineering. This book is made for a computer science student and does a good job of hitting all basic theory in computer science.

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I find combinatorics to be a field where there is little theory and the bulk of it is formulating the problem in the correct way. So I'd recommend Lovasz's Combinatorial problems and exercises.

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