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A standard Calculus I textbook usually has a number of optimization problems in mensuration, physics, biology and economics/finance, crossing a river via canoe and foot, laying a pipeline to an oil rig, carrying a ladder around a corner, etc. (By optimization, I mean finding maxima/minima).

For some reason, I don't see problems from chemistry. Is this because optimization doesn't come up so much in chemistry, or it isn't important, or it becomes too technical for a maths textbook? Or something else?

If there are such problems, can anyone name a few / give some references.

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The one that immediately comes to mind for me is instances when we are optimizing production of reactions which are exothermic and encounter the rate-equilibrium paradox.

Heating the reaction will cause more particles to have sufficient energy to react and increase the rate according to the Arrhenius Equation. Conversely, since the reaction is exothermic an increase in temperature will le chatlier shift the reaction in the reverse direction. We need to optimize the rate in the forward direction to make as much product as possible. Find the temperature to accomplish this optimization.

A good example of such a reaction is the Haber Process.

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