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Why are first integrals constant along characteristic curves? My lecturer in a PDE course seems to be using this fact. I found a nice explanation of what a first integral is here: Why are they called "first integrals"?. However, I am unable to connect this with the concept of a characteristic, or understand why first integrals are constant along characteristics. For context, this was used in explaining "alternative method of solution using characteristics", that is constructing a family of characteristic curves using two linearly independent first integrals of a pde.

Maybe this is relevant: What does constant along characteristic mean, but I don't see how.

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you perhaps provide a specific example? It's not clear (to me at least) exactly what you're referring to. Maybe the best thing would be to actually ask the lecturer? $\endgroup$ Oct 17, 2021 at 9:25

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