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for somebody having a quite strong background in Mathematics, which are some good books for the domain of Operations research? I guess there are textbooks covering topics like linear and nonlinear optimization, convex optimization and quadratic programming, dynamic programming, multicriterial optimizations (did I miss something?)

Thanks, Lucian

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    $\begingroup$ You might be interested in the answers to a similar question on the OR Exchange: or-exchange.com/questions/478 $\endgroup$ Commented Oct 23, 2010 at 18:45
  • $\begingroup$ A new Stack Exchange website called Operations Research has been approved and is expected to be opened soon. $\endgroup$
    – Rob
    Commented May 28, 2019 at 13:02

6 Answers 6

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Stephen Boyd and Lieven Vandenberghe's book is popular, and available free online: http://www.stanford.edu/~boyd/cvxbook/

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Linear Programming -- A Concise Introduction by Thomas S. Ferguson and other ebooks/lecture notes on Optimization listed in Rod Carvalho's web notebook.

Addendum: The classic and complete book by Hillier and Lieberman Introduction to Operations Research

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If you want books that give a broad introduction to operations research (including optimization, queuing theory etc.)

The classics are:

Operations Research - Ronald Rardin

Operations Research - Wayne Winston

They are excellent from pedagogical point of view.

If you want to get into linear programming, this book is widely regarded to be one of the best:

Linear Programming - Vasek Chvatal.

For nonlinear programming:

Nonlinear programming - Dimitri Bertsekas

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Here is a compilation of books taken from OR-Exchange.

http://industrialengineertools.blogspot.com/2010/08/favorite-operations-research-books-from.html

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Winston-Operations Research-Applications and Algorithms is a very good book to start with.

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introduction to operation research-Hillier and Libermann They give pretty good motivation for the material being presented

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