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I am a student, and due to my school's decision to not teach Calculus in high school (They said we'd learn it in college, but that's a year and a half away for me), I have to learn it myself. I am trying to get a summer internship as a Bioinformatics intern, and I would like to have prior knowledge (I was told I'd need an understanding of calculus to get the internship.)

I have heard of MIT's OpenCourseWare, which I had taken a look at, but I was wondering if there were any other resources (Preferably free of charge, I don't have much money to spend)

Is there any good online (Preferably free) way to learn Calculus?

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  • $\begingroup$ Pauls' online notes should be a decent one. $\endgroup$ – newbie May 31 '13 at 21:28
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    $\begingroup$ (Patrick JMT)[patrickjmt.com/] is also a good one. His videos are a little faster paced than Khan's, which I personally think is a good thing. $\endgroup$ – Robert Mastragostino May 31 '13 at 21:34
  • $\begingroup$ This isn't a way to learn calculus, but rather to test your conceptual understanding of the material. This website offers a bunch of fake proofs of ridiculous claims ($\sin x > 0$ for all $x$, $0 = 1$, etc.) using calculus, and you have to try to find what the error is. I've found it to be fun and useful for developing logical careful thinking in mathematics at a lower level. $\endgroup$ – Stahl May 31 '13 at 21:38
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Have you looked at the Khan Academy? There are tutorials for just about every topic in Calculus, particularly if you're just beginning to learn Calculus.

Topics covered in the first two or three semesters of college calculus. Everything from limits to derivatives to integrals to vector calculus. Should understand the topics in the pre-calculus playlist first (the limit videos are in both playlists)

MIT OpenCourseWare (Link to Calculus: single-variable, with lecture videos) can give you a nice outline of what topics to master, and how to progress through these topics, and includes video lectures, as well as handouts you can download.

Another great resource is Paul's Notes, which is presented as a progressive tutorial.

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Try this site, it's interesting math doctor bob.

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MIT OpenCourseWare is useful. Also, check out Paul's Online Notes:

http://tutorial.math.lamar.edu/Classes/CalcI/CalcI.aspx

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www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses

www.coursera.org/courses

Coursera comes with problem sets, the lectures are paced, and you can discuss things with your classmates on the associated forums.

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Go online and order a calculus book from an older edition. My advice, take Stewart Calculus. The current edition is the 7th, thus expensive, even used. Purchase the 6th edition that can be had for a nickel and a dime and you got yourself an excellent resource. Along with the websites listed by my colleagues, you can get quite far.

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