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What are the prerequisites for learning calculus? I have experience in proof writing, trigonometric functions,permutations and combinations,naive set theory, mathematical induction, and the abstract notion of functions. Should I start calculus or should I complete some other prerequisites?I want to learn calculus more by theorems and proofs than computation. Can I learn calculus theorems without much experience in computational calculus? Is it mandatory to do computational calculus first?How many hours should i devote to it?Can I self study calculus?

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    $\begingroup$ You need solid algebra skills; almost nothing that you mention is a true prerequisite (trigonometric functions can be learned along-the-way, on a “just-in-time” basis). Knowing what a function is might be nice, but it’s usually just the first thing you need in calculus. Note that calculus is about calculation (hence the name). If what you want is the abstract mathematical theory, that’s called “Analysis”, not calculus. $\endgroup$ Feb 7 at 2:58
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Calculus has many levels. The prerequisite is pre-calculus. Here is a free online pre-calculus textbook. If you are above this level, then you are ready for Calculus I.

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