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enter image description here

What does the "right" Y-axis represent?

Taken from here: https://istheservicedown.co.uk/status/virgin-media/2654675-bristol-bristol-england-united-kingdom

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    $\begingroup$ It was not idea to cut off the title of the graph. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:28
  • $\begingroup$ I think it means the two are proportional. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:29
  • $\begingroup$ think that the blue curve represents number of reports of T-Mobile and the green curve the number of reports of Orange networks $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:40

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Looking around the provided site it looks like the blue curve represents the number of reports for Virgin Media outages in the UK, whereas the green curve is the number of reports specific to Bristol. The units on the left are for the blue (country-wide) curve, and the units on the right are for the green (local) curve. For example, consider the excerpted images below. Note that in each case the blue curve matches the graph of total Virgin Media outages, whereas the green curve (and corresponding scale on the right axis) change depending on locality.

Virgin Media outages in the UK: enter image description here

Virgin Media outages in the Bristol: enter image description here

Virgin Media outages in the London: enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ But how can the green curve be higher than the blue curve? $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:38
  • $\begingroup$ @callculus the numbers on the right are the scale for the green curve, so there are not actually more reports, the scales are just different. $\endgroup$
    – DMcMor
    Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:43
  • $\begingroup$ This might be right. $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:45
  • $\begingroup$ If you look at different localities the green curves change but the blue stays the same, so I believe it is correct. $\endgroup$
    – DMcMor
    Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 20:46

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