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I've read the wikipedia article on mathematical analysis and this, but I can't exactly find an answer. Is real analysis just some pure math, or does it really have something to with physical applications? Feel free to send me any references that might answer my question, thanks!

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  • $\begingroup$ Any way I can somewhat refine my question? $\endgroup$ – joejacobz May 5 '13 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ The name "real analysis" has not anything to do with "real applications". It hints that we're doing analysis using the real numbers. $\endgroup$ – Fredrik Meyer May 5 '13 at 15:37
  • $\begingroup$ Can you be a bit more specific about the definition of 'real analysis' and 'real world'? $\endgroup$ – Alex May 5 '13 at 16:22
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Engineers and physicists need to solve differential equations. Most differential equations are impossible to solve symbolically. Instead, one obtains a numerical solution by either approximation methods or infinite series. Analysis was invented to understand the circumstances under which these methods produce correct answers. For example, when does the formal power series solution of a differential equation converge to the actual solution?

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  • $\begingroup$ +1. "Analysis was invented to understand the circumstances under which these methods produce correct answers". $<=$ Quite true !!!. $\endgroup$ – Felix Marin Jun 15 '17 at 19:37
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Each time someone does a derivative, integrates something, or solves a differential equation she is doing real analysis. Our modern world (starting with the most down-to-earth apliances and even furniture) would be totally impossible without it.

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Real analysis stems from the concept of the real numbers.where each numbers on the real number line are understood as pattitions with infinite enumerations.it tries to analyse the relationship between partitions.its application can be clearly seen in the computer world,engineering,etc.

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