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I was reading about infinite pro-$p$ groups of finite coclass from the book "The Structure of Groups of Prime Power Order" by Leedham-Green and McKay.

To recall, the coclass of a finite $p$-group $G$ of order $p^n$ is defined as $n-c$ where $c$ is the nilpotency class of $G$. In case of infinite pro-$p$ groups, an infinite pro-$p$ group $S$ is said to be of finite coclass $r$ if its lower central series quotients $S/\gamma_i(S)$ are finite $p$-groups and $S/\gamma_i(S)$ has coclass $r$ for all $i\ge t$ for some $t\ge 0$.

I was thinking about solvability and I think it can be shown that if $G$ is a solvable group of solvable length $l$ then every subgroup and quotient of $G$ has solvable length at most $l$ (please correct me if I am wrong). My question is related to the "opposite" of this property.

My question is

Let $S$ be an infinite pro-$p$ group of finite coclass. Suppose there exists a non-negative integer $t$ such that the solvable length of each lower central series quotient $S/\gamma_i(S)$ is less than or equal to $l$ for all $i\ge t$. Then is it true that the $S$ is solvable with solvable length less than or equal to $l$?

Thanks in advance.

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