2
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

I do not know the name of the math symbol with the arrow bracket pointing to the right. Any help identifying it or resource to find it would be helpful. I already checked the LA symbols on Wikipedia and no look. Thanks!

$\endgroup$
4
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ It's "\mapsto": $x \mapsto Ax$ $\endgroup$
    – Theo C.
    Jun 22, 2020 at 5:47
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ In general, use detexify.kirelabs.org/classify.html $\endgroup$ Jun 22, 2020 at 5:47
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Wow, that was fast and well said. Thank you, kind sir! $\endgroup$
    – Jaxx
    Jun 22, 2020 at 5:49
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thanks Ben! REALLY USEFUL SITE ^_^ $\endgroup$
    – Jaxx
    Jun 22, 2020 at 5:50

2 Answers 2

4
$\begingroup$

The symbol is essentially "maps to", as pointed out in the comments.

As, for its purpose, the maps to symbol describes the input and output of a function, as its name suggests (a input maps to this point)...

See https://wumbo.net/symbol/maps-to/ for more details.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Gill's answer is a wonderful explanation. Here is what I wish someone told me when I was a linear algebra student as an undergraduate:

Let $A$ and $B$ be sets where $a \in A$ and $b \in B$. Now, let $f$ $ \subseteq A \times B$ be a map from $A$ to $B$. When we write down a map we state the name of the map followed by the traditional arrow notation from the domain ($A$) to the codomain ($B$). Stacked directly below is the defintion of the map: a description of how every $a \in$ $A$ is assigned exactly one $b \in$ $B$ such as $$\color{blue} {f : A \to B}$$ $$\color{red}{a \mapsto f(a) = a^2}.$$ Where the line in $\color{blue}{blue}$ reads "$f$ is a map from $A$ to $B$" and the line in $\color{red}{red}$ (to answer your question about $\mapsto$) reads "$f$ maps $a$ to $f(a)$" (where $f(a)$ is precisely $a^2$ in this example).

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.