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Is this identity valid? $a$, $b$, $c$ are all random variables.

$$da = \int(\int d(a|b,c) db)dc$$

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  • $\begingroup$ What does $d$ mean here? $\endgroup$ – kimchi lover May 27 '20 at 12:19
  • $\begingroup$ Like if i have $\int x dx$, can I replace the dx by something like the probably wrong identity I am asking about. d is the leibniz notation of derivative. $\endgroup$ – junior-flight May 27 '20 at 12:31
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It's hard to answer your question because of its notational vagueness and lack of hypotheses.

It seems to me you are either asking a question about conditional density functions, in which case the answer is "no" because not all random variables have density functions. Or you might be asking about conditional distributions in the sense of this section of a Wikipedia article. In which case the answer might well be, "possibly", if you were clearer about what you were asking.

So the meta-advice is: learn a bit more about probability theory, from a standard textbook that takes an abstract measure-theoretic approach, and reformulate your question.

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