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It's been a while since I've been in any math classes. I have a linear function $(T-c)m = B$. I have many samples of $T$ and $B$, but no idea what $m$ and $c$ are. How do I solve this?

My first thought was to use limits to get $m$ and then just solve for $c$, but I don't know. Such a simple function, surely there is a simple way to solve it that I'm overlooking.

$c$ and $m$ are both constants by the way. As $T$ increases, so does $B$. $0 < m < 1$, $c > 0$.

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  • $\begingroup$ the tags are a reflection that I have no idea how to solve it. $\endgroup$ – brandon Apr 24 '11 at 15:05
  • $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linear_regression $\endgroup$ – joriki Apr 24 '11 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ ah perfect, you should put it as an answer so I can give you credit! $\endgroup$ – brandon Apr 24 '11 at 15:10
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What you're trying to do is called linear regression.

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