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How to draw a graph that represents the set of strings of 0's and 1's containing

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  • $\begingroup$ well, as you suggested, you are missing details. $\endgroup$ – Jorge Fernández Hidalgo Dec 4 '19 at 22:24
  • $\begingroup$ To add to Jorge's comment, there should be some restrictions on the graph. Should it be maybe connected? Otherwise you can just take the trivial case of a disconnected graph with an empty edge-set and countable vertex-set. $\endgroup$ – Randy Savage Dec 4 '19 at 22:31
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    $\begingroup$ You could think of these strings as paths in a graph with three vertices representing $0$,$1$,$11$, with no edge between $1$ and $11$, edges between the other two pairs of points and a loop at $0$. $\endgroup$ – S. Dolan Dec 4 '19 at 22:43
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    $\begingroup$ You would not go from 1 to 11 because that would give you three 1s in succession. $\endgroup$ – S. Dolan Dec 4 '19 at 23:07
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    $\begingroup$ That would allow you to loop round lots of times and again get lots of 1s. $\endgroup$ – S. Dolan Dec 4 '19 at 23:09
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Follow any path in the following Digraph from Start to End, recording the character(s) in the square nodes. Edges in a path can be traversed multiple times.

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