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I know this must be stupid question, but I was wondering why cannot a quadratic or any polynomial equation be in format of $$x=ay^2+by+c$$

and to find roots we set $x=0$.

In short, can the $y$ intercepts also be roots of quadratic equation?

I searched online and found that $y$ is imaginary and $x$ is real axis but I couldn't understand why polynomial equation when intercept $y$-axis and is solution to equation.

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migrated from physics.stackexchange.com May 25 at 16:53

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Quadratic and polynomial equations CAN be written in terms of y rather than x. However, it is convention that we use x as the independent variable and y as the dependent one. thats why we always see $$y=ax^2+bx+c$$ rather than $$x=ay^2+by+c$$

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  • $\begingroup$ but y cannot be the roots be equation right? I don' t know why but I read online because of imaginary and real axis but I couldn't get the idea . $\endgroup$ – Radha Krishna May 25 at 16:54
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, y can be root to the equation. But they would be y-axis intercepts, not x axis. When you read that Y axis was imaginary and x was real you were probably reading about imaginary, numbers, because they are graphed that way (imaginary part on y and real on x) $\endgroup$ – Nick Heumann May 25 at 16:57

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