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Given a set of functions $F$ of which all are functions in $X \to X$, where certain functions, say $a, b \in F$ can be composed together: $a(b(x)) = (a \circ b)(x)$. What is the notation for the set of all possible permutations of compositions of functions in $F$?

For example, say $F = \{a, b\}$ where $a, b : X \to X$, all the possible permutations of compositions of functions in $F$ are:

$(a \circ a)(x)$

$(a \circ b)(x)$

$(b \circ a)(x)$

$(b \circ b)(x)$

How would the set of the above be expressed in terms of $F$ in general? Should I not be expressing these functions as a set?

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  • $\begingroup$ You could write $\{ f \circ g \mid f,g \in F \}$. $\endgroup$ – Clive Newstead May 15 '19 at 16:28
  • $\begingroup$ I forgot to mention that I'm looking for a general notation. My example was to simplify the example permutation set but the cardinality of $F$ is undefined and may be arbitrarily large. $\endgroup$ – Shiri May 15 '19 at 16:32
  • $\begingroup$ So you don't allow $a \circ a \circ a$ in your set? $\endgroup$ – Jair Taylor May 15 '19 at 16:38
  • $\begingroup$ @JairTaylor My mistake I was initially thinking of a fixed sample size of $|F|$ but yes I do allow $a \circ a \circ a$ $\endgroup$ – Shiri May 17 '19 at 10:44
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Note, you haven't provided all possible compositions, since there's also $aba$ and $abaaabbbaba$. Confusingly, the mathematical literature calls these "words".

You could use the Kleene star notation (in your case, $F^*$ ) to describe all possible words you can make, and interpret the words as compositions.

By the way, since function composition is associative, this structure forms a semigroup.

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  • $\begingroup$ It's even a monoid, since we have the identity arrow. Oh, my. It's a category. $\endgroup$ – Jackozee Hakkiuz May 15 '19 at 17:49

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