1
$\begingroup$

If you have a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional vectors, are vector operations (like dot product, cross product, addition, etc) defined between these two vectors? I though that since two-dimensional vectors can be written as three dimensional vectors with third component being zero, this is possible.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ If you write vectors as $2i-4j+3k$, it even comes naturally to do exactly that. A two-dimensional vector looks just like a 3d vector with the last component zero. $\endgroup$ – user53153 Mar 5 '13 at 5:52
1
$\begingroup$

Depends how nitpicky you want to be. If you can embed the two-dimensional vector into a subspace of the three-dimensional space, then of course there is a natural way to extend it. Depends on what you want to do!

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.