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I'm trying to learn what a Taylor series is, This is the equation I'm looking at and I know 0 calculus. I have been told that $F'(x)$ is a derivative but what does $F''(x)$ mean?

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    $\begingroup$ shouldn't it be "what do $F'$ and $F''$ mean?" $\endgroup$ – mathworker21 Apr 17 '19 at 5:18
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean? that's what I wrote. $\endgroup$ – Loren Meehan Apr 17 '19 at 5:23
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    $\begingroup$ @LorenMeehan : No, you used a double quote. The comment used two single quotes, which could have been a hint that it's more like (F')' :) $\endgroup$ – vsz Apr 17 '19 at 6:04
  • $\begingroup$ oh, ok. thanks for clarifying. $\endgroup$ – Loren Meehan Apr 17 '19 at 7:09
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    $\begingroup$ @vsz I italicized "do" for a reason... $\endgroup$ – mathworker21 Apr 17 '19 at 7:16
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$f''$ denotes the second derivative of $f$; that is to say, it is the derivative of the derivative of $f$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks! I feel quite stupid now that I didn't figure that myself. $\endgroup$ – Loren Meehan Apr 17 '19 at 5:22
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    $\begingroup$ Don't beat yourself up over it, I can understand how it might happen for your first foray into calculus. A good chunk of the notation can be a bit unintuitive at times. :p $\endgroup$ – Eevee Trainer Apr 17 '19 at 5:25

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