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Let $A \in \mathbb R^{m×n}, m > n,$ and denote the columns of $A$ by $a_1, a_2, . . . , a_n \in \mathbb R^m$. Let $Q \in \mathbb R^{m×n}$ be a matrix with orthonormal columns, and let $q_1, q_2, · · · , q_n \in \mathbb R^m$ denote the columns of $Q$. Let $R \in \mathbb R^{n×n}$ be upper triangular, and $A = QR$. This is called an economy size $QR$ decomposition. The matrix $Q$ is not square, and therefore does not count as an orthogonal matrix, but it does have n orthonormal columns. Then: $r_{11} = ±\|a_1\|_2, q_1 = a_1/r_{11}, r_{12} = q_1^T > a_2, r_{22} = ±\|a_2 − r_{12}q_1\|_2, q_2 = (a_2 − r_{12}q_1)/r_{22}$ and so on (This is Gram-Schmidt procedure). One thing that’s really not so nice about the Gram-Schmidt procedure described is the possibility of dividing by zero in a few places. Let’s say for instance that $r_{33}$ came out to be zero. Then define: $$q_3=\frac{u-(q_1^Tu)q_1-(q_2^Tu)q_2}{\|u-(q_1^Tu)q_1-(q_2^Tu)q_2\|}.$$ Explain why $q_3$ is well-defined unless u lies in the span of $q_1$ and $q_2$.

My attempt: I can show one way that if $u = c_1q_1+c_2q_2$, then $u-(q_1^Tu)q_1-(q_2^Tu)q_2=u-(q_1^T(c_1q_1+c_2q_2))q_1-(q_2^T(c_1q_1+c_2q_2))q_2=u-c_1q_1-c_2q_2=0$ How to show that this is the only case when $\|u-(q_1^Tu)q_1-(q_2^Tu)q_2\|$ is $0$?

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Yes, since $q_1,q_2$ are orthogonal, $(q_1'u)q_1+(q_2'u)q_2$ is precisely the projection of $u$ on the space spanned by $q_1$ and $q_2$. Note that if $v$ is any non-zero vector then the projection of a vector $u$ onto column space of $v$ is given by $(vv')u/v'v=v(v'u)/v'v=(v'u/v'v)v$. Here $q_1,q_2$ being orthonormal, $q_1'q_1=q_2'q_2=1$.

So the undefinedness happens precisely when the denominator of your expression is zero, and that happens precisely when $u=Pu$ where $P$ is the projection matrix onto the space spanned by $q_1,q_2$ that is, $P=q_1q_1'+q_2q_2'$, that is precisely when $u$ belongs to the linear span of $q_1,q_2$.

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