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If the question they tell me to find a number and they give me 3 informations/conditions: A B C If I found this number from A and B will it work in C?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Hans Lundmark, gt6989b, Leucippus, Eevee Trainer, John Omielan Apr 2 at 20:38

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  • $\begingroup$ This is very vague. Depends on the question. One might expect that if (A) and (B) are enough to give a specific value, but it is possible the question means to give you conditions that contradict, and no value is appropriate. $\endgroup$ – Thomas Andrews Apr 2 at 18:22
  • $\begingroup$ I mean the second thing $\endgroup$ – Selim Jean Ellieh Apr 2 at 18:38
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That totally depends on the conditions. Take for example the following set of conditions:

$A$: 'the number must be odd'

$B$: 'the number must be a prime number'

$C$: 'the number must be smaller than 4'

Then from $A$ and $B$ you can deduce all possible prime numbers $>2$, however, from statements $A$, $B$ and $C$ the only possible number is $3$, so in this case not everything derived from $A$ and $B$ gives a solution to $A,B$ and $C$.

If you can derive the statement $C$ from the statements $A$ and $B$, then an answer to $A$ and $B$ directly define an answer to $C$. Take for example the following set of conditions:

$A$: 'the number must be odd'

$B$: 'the number must be a prime number'

$C$: 'the number must be greater than $2$'

Then $C$ automatically follows from $A$ and $B$.

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