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Say you have a collection of data points $p_i \in \Bbb R^3$, and a collection of corresponding reference points $r_i \in \Bbb R^3$. Kabsch's algorithm, which relies on SVD decomposition, provides an efficient way to determine the rigid transformation that best (in a least squares of errors sense) transforms the $r_i$ to $p_i$.

This is equivalent to saying that if each $p_i$ is known to have been chosen as a 3-D Gaussian variate with unit variance and mean at the transformed value of $r_i$, then the solution found is the transformation with the highest likelihood.

Having determined that transformation, which is described by a translation vector $\vec t$ and a rotation $R$ characterized as the product of three axial rotations $$ R = R_z(\psi)R_y(\theta)R_x(\phi) $$ I would like to calculate the covariance matrix among $\{t_x, t_y, t_z, \psi, \theta, \phi\}$.

Is there a "standard" or particularly elegant/efficient way to find that covariance, given that we already have the intermediate information used by Kabsch's algorithm?

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