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A piece of art receives an integer mark from $0$ to $100$ for each of the categories design, technique and originality. In how many ways is it possible to score a total mark of $200$?

I got the answer of $5151$ by writing out some cases. Is there a faster way to do this?

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  • $\begingroup$ You're looking for the number of integer solutions to $x_0 + x_1 + x_2 = 200$. See this post: math.stackexchange.com/questions/919676/… $\endgroup$
    – Matti P.
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 8:43
  • $\begingroup$ The restriction in the question is that each group has a maximum. $\endgroup$
    – Chris Ta
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 8:47
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to MathSE. This tutorial explains how to typeset mathematics on this site. $\endgroup$ Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 9:57

2 Answers 2

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Basically, we need to find out the number of solutions to $x_0+x_1+x_2=200$ with $0\leq x_i\leq 100$ for all $i$ and furthermore it should hold that $x_0+x_1\geq 100$

Once $x_0$ and $x_1$ are assigned, $x_2$ is automatically determined as $200-x_0-x_1$

Assigning $x_0=0$, there is only one choice for $x_1$ which is $100$

Assigning $x_0=1$, there are two choices for $x_1$, which are $99$ and $100$

Assigning $x_0=k$, there are $k+1$ choices for $x_1$, from $100-k$ to $100$

So, there are a total of $$\sum_{k=0}^{100}(k+1)=\sum_{k=1}^{101}k=\frac{101\times 102}2=5151$$ choices.

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  • $\begingroup$ +1. the answer by @N.F.Taussig is more general but you found a surprising (to me) way to exploit the fact that $100$ is exactly half of $200$. neat! $\endgroup$
    – antkam
    Commented Mar 1, 2019 at 19:39
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Since the marks can range from $0$ to $100$, we wish to solve the equation $$x_1 + x_2 + x_3 = 200 \tag{1}$$ in the nonnegative integers subject to the restrictions that $x_1, x_2, x_3 \leq 100$.

If there were no restrictions, then a particular solution of equation 1 corresponds to the placement of two addition signs in a row of $200$ ones.

Let's illustrate with the equation $y_1 + y_2 + y_3 = 10$.
$$1 1 1 1 + 1 1 1 1 1 + 1$$ corresponds to the solution $y_1 = 4$, $y_2 = 5$, $y_3 = 1$, while $$1 1 1 1 1 + + 1 1 1 1 1$$ corresponds to the solution $y_1 = 5$, $y_2 = 0$, $y_3 = 5$.

The number of solutions of equation 1 in the nonnegative integers is $$\binom{200 + 3 - 1}{3 - 1} = \binom{202}{2}$$ since we must choose which two of the $202$ positions required for $200$ ones and two addition signs will be filled with addition signs.

From these, we must subtract those solutions in which one of the variables exceeds $100$. Notice that at most one variable may exceed $100$ since $2 \cdot 101 = 202$. There are three ways to choose the variable that exceeds $100$. Suppose it is $x_1$. Then $x_1' = x_1 - 101$ is a nonegative integer. Substituting $x_1' + 101$ for $x_1$ in equation 1 yields \begin{align*} x_1' + 101 + x_2 + x_3 & = 200\\ x_1' + x_2 + x_3 & = 99 \tag{2} \end{align*} Equation 2 is an equation in the nonnegative integers with $$\binom{99 + 3 - 1}{3 - 1} = \binom{102}{2}$$ Hence, there are $$\binom{3}{1}\binom{101}{2}$$ solutions that violate the restrictions $x_1, x_2, x_3 \leq 100$.

Hence, the number of ways a total mark of $200$ can be obtained on three tests in which the maximum possible score is $100$ is $$\binom{202}{2} - \binom{3}{1}\binom{101}{2} = 5151$$ as you found.

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