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Does the word "proof" has meaning only in mathematics ? when in conversations someone ask someone else to prove something what exactly does he mean ?

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closed as off-topic by Servaes, Lord Shark the Unknown, David G. Stork, JMoravitz, Rob Arthan Jan 18 at 20:42

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question is not about mathematics, within the scope defined in the help center." – Servaes, Lord Shark the Unknown, David G. Stork, JMoravitz, Rob Arthan
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ If someone asks for "proof" they are asking for evidence or logic that directly implies the desired result. This is not always easy to do in real life scenarios, hence the phrase "prove beyond a reasonable doubt" is often meant instead. This is a question for a dictionary, not a question for a math forum. $\endgroup$ – JMoravitz Jan 18 at 20:41
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    $\begingroup$ This is good question, but it is about language not mathematics. $\endgroup$ – Rob Arthan Jan 18 at 20:42
  • $\begingroup$ A proof is a valid argument : it uses "informal" logic and obviously must start from assumptions. Philosophy and science are full of proofs. $\endgroup$ – Mauro ALLEGRANZA Jan 23 at 9:05

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