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I'm using a somewhat old presentation from 2011 that covers twistor geometry.

It uses the notation "$L = Z_1 \wedge Z_2$" to suggest that the line $L$ is the "join of the twistors $Z_1$ and $Z_2$, which are simply points in this twistor space.

However, I have always learned that the line between two points, which is essentially what this is, is just given by writing $L=Z_1Z_2$. Is there any difference between the two? Does this wedge notation have any other meaning that I'm not aware of? Is there any other standard notation that I have omitted?

EDIT: For reference, the full presentation is available at https://indico.cern.ch/event/137430/contributions/146026/attachments/113502/161251/Atrani_1_Duhr.pdf.

See the screenshot of the relevant section here.

EDIT2: Found the answer, will accept in 2 days when I'm allowed to! See below.

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Answer lies in Boolean algebra. Why is $\wedge$ a minimum and $\vee$ a maximum? and http://homepages.math.uic.edu/~kauffman/BooleanAlg.pdf are the resources used. Turns out that in Boolean notation $A \wedge B = AB$, who'd've thunk'd it!

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