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I'm tasked with the following problem:

Evaluate $$I_C=\frac{1}{2\pi}\int_{0}^{2\pi}\left(\frac{d}{d\theta}\phi(\theta)\right) d\theta,\quad\text{where}\; \phi(\theta)=\arctan\left[\frac{3\cos(\theta)}{4(\cos(\theta)+\sin(\theta))}\right]$$

Am I correct in assuming that this is simply $\phi(2\pi)-\phi(0)$? When I do that I get zero, but when I take the derivative, then evaluate the integral I get -1. How do I use the fundamental theorem of calculus to get the correct answer?

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Hint: what happens at $\theta =3\pi/4, 7\pi/4$? See the graph if required.

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