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in dummit and foote text , galois theory is presented in chapter 14 . group theory is presented in 6 chapter , ring theory in 3 chapter and so on

my qestion is , which chapters of the text is needed to study galois theory in the text ??

stanford class for example teach chapter 1 , 2 , 3 ,4 , 7 ,8 and ommit chapter 5 , 6 . is those two chapters are important for the study of galois theory ??

what about the rest of the chapters ? which chapters is important for the study of galois theory in the text ??

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    $\begingroup$ What class of Stanford are you referring to? Is that class on Galois theory? If in briefest terms, of course one could start learning the theory after one learns something about field theory and group theory. I suppose that Stanford class skips group theory because of its simplicity, not for it is irrelevant. $\endgroup$ – awllower Feb 12 '13 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ @awllower , no , it's not a course on galois theory , here it is , math.stanford.edu/~galatius/120F12 $\endgroup$ – Fawzy Hegab Feb 12 '13 at 13:19
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I'd say chapters $\,5-6\,$ in D&F can be skipped at first without impairing the basic understanding of Galois Theory, yet you're really going to need to know about soluble (solvable) groups in order to understand the whole thing, and this appears in chapter 6.

Of course, you need some ring theory and field theory, at least the necessary up to polynomial rings, quotient rings, fields extensions, etc.

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  • $\begingroup$ is there any chapters can be skipped like 5 , 6 ? $\endgroup$ – Fawzy Hegab Feb 12 '13 at 13:20
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    $\begingroup$ I'd say that most of chapters 10, 11, 12, hoping one already knows some basic liner algebra (otherwise chapter 11 is a must), and that's all up to chapter 14 $\endgroup$ – DonAntonio Feb 12 '13 at 14:06

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