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Let $\sum=\{a,b,c,d\}$, $L=\{a^ib^jcd^k \big| i\ge0; k>j>0\}$. Prove that $L$ is not regular using pumping lemma.

We can choose the word $Z=a^0b^{n}cd^{n+1}=b^{n}cd^{n+1}\in L$. Let $uvw$ be the decomposition of $Z$ . Because $|uv|\le n$ and $|v|\ge 1$, $v=b^t$, $1\le t\le n$ and $uv^2w=b^{n+t}cd^{n+1}$. Because $t\ge 1$ then $n+t\ge n+1$ so $uv^2w\notin L$ in contradiction to the given.


What I don't understand here is why $uv=b$. Usually, according to the pumping lemma:

$\exists n\ge 1, n\in \mathbb N$, such that for all $Z\in L$, $|Z|\ge n$ exists a decomposition $Z=uvw$ such that $|uv|\le n$, $|v|\ge 1$, for all $n\ge 0$ and $Z_n=uv^nw$.

Thus for example for $\sum=\{a,b\}, Z=a^nb^b\quad$ $\exists s,t:s \ge 0, t\ge 1, s+t\le n$ so $u=a^s, v=a^t, w=a^{n-s-t}b^n$.


How does this definition apply to the decomposition of $b^ncd^{n+1}$? Shouldn't $u=b^s, v=c^t, w=b^{n-s-t}c^td^{n+1}$?

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As stated in the lemma, $uv$ has at most $n$ symbols. Further, $uv$ is a prefix of the word $b^ncd^{n+1}$, because your factorization is $uvw = b^ncd^{n+1}$. Because all of the first $n$ symbols of $b^ncd^{n+1}$ are $b$, both $u$ and $v$ can only contain $b$s.

I suppose $uv=b$ is a typo (this is not claimed anywhere), and you mean you do not understand why $uv = b^j$ for some $j$.

The decomposition you propose is of a string $b^s c^t, b^{n-s-t}c^td^{n+1}$, which has several $c$ and two changes from $b$ to $c$, if all exponents are non-zero. So the factored word is not $b^ncd^{n+1}$.

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  • $\begingroup$ I got it, indeed because the first $n$ symbols of $b^ncd^{n+1}$ are $b$'s, therefore the prefix is $b^n$. Then let $t\ge 1, s\ge 0, s+t\le n\implies u=b^s, v=b^t, w=b^{n-s-t}cd^{n+1}\implies Z=b^{n+t(i-1)}cd^{n+1}$. So for $i=2$ we get $b^{n+t}cd^{n+1}$. $\endgroup$ – Yos Nov 10 '18 at 11:09

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