1
$\begingroup$

Are there any resources which describe FLT in a very tangible way which will motivate students to be interested in this subject?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You mean, a very large margin? $\endgroup$ – J.-E. Pin Aug 25 '18 at 10:24
  • $\begingroup$ @matqkks: You might want to review matheducators.stackexchange.com/questions/12226/…. $\endgroup$ – Moo Aug 25 '18 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ I like Paulo Ribenboim's books. One is "Fermat's Last Theorem for Amateurs." Another is "13 Lectures." He writes concisely but somehow kindly. $\endgroup$ – B. Goddard Aug 25 '18 at 12:57
2
$\begingroup$

Leo Corry had written a reasonably concise note on the Fermat's last theorem (including some historical anecdotes). I found it as a very interesting read. Since, the question included 'motivation' as an aspect, one thing that will help is to introduce the history and drama associated with it. This draft surely will be a helpful one, in that regards.

https://www.tau.ac.il/~corry/publications/articles/pdf/Fermat-History.pdf

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem

I recommend this book based on my personal experience. When you start reading it, it's almost impossible to put it down.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

About ten years ago I wrote a monograph directed at students with a high school competency. It goes through many proofs of intermediate results that preceded the Wiles proof, but no higher analysis. It focuses on the mathematics, and not the history. I don't know whether it is still in print. See:

https://www.amazon.com/Conversations-Fermat-Keith-Backman/dp/158909445X

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.