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Is there a tree with seven vertices:
a) With five vertices having degree 1 and two vertices having degree 2? b) With vertices having degrees 2,2,2,3,1,1,1?

So I believe the degree is the number of children vertices there are from the vertex? For a) I believe the answer is yes because I was able to draw a tree as such but for b) I believe the answer is no because I could not conceptualize a tree like this.

I may be taking the wrong definition of degree though or might be thinking about "rooted" trees only. Thank you for any help clarifying this concept and if there is a formula/ theorem for this.

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    $\begingroup$ Recheck your answer to (a)... $\endgroup$ – Casteels Mar 8 '18 at 19:41
  • $\begingroup$ Do you know the handshaking lemma? $\endgroup$ – Kevin Long Mar 8 '18 at 19:53
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HINT

Since every edge will connect exactly two vertices, every edge you add to a graph will increase the sum total of all degrees of all vertices in the graph by $2$. So ... the sum total should always be what kind of number?

So, count a little harder for whatever you drew for a) ...

Also, try a little harder for b) ...

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For (b) start drawing from the vertices of degree 1, since the look of the graph at those vertices is unique.

You can probably get to this example:

.-.-.-.-.<:

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